Hippolyte Grignon[1, 2]
Male 1790 - 1851

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  • Birth  14 Sep 1790  Green Bay, , Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4, 5
    Gender  Male 
    Died  4 Feb 1851  Little Chute, Outagamie, Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 6, 7
    Person ID  I13286  MOFP
    Last Modified  14 Aug 2007 
     
    Father  Pierre Grignon, Sr.,   b. 16 Nov 1740, Parish Of Crondines, Montreal, , Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Nov 1795, Green Bay, , Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Louise Domitilde De Langlade,   b. 1759,   d. 1823 
    Married  1776 
    Family ID  F5926  Group Sheet
     
    Family 1  Indian Woman,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married  1815 
    Last Modified  12 Sep 2007 
    Family ID  F5039  Group Sheet
     
    Family 2  Indian Woman,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married  1821 
    Type: Divorced 
    Divorced  Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified  12 Sep 2007 
    Family ID  F5040  Group Sheet
     
    Family 3  Nanette Wei To Sha,   b. 1786,   d. 1811 
    Married  18 Jun 1823  [8
    Type: Divorced 
    Divorced  Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified  12 Sep 2007 
    Family ID  F5041  Group Sheet
     
    Family 4  Lisette Chorette,   b. Abt 1813, , , Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Apr 1898, , Outagamie, Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  9 Jul 1829  Green Bay, Brown, Wisconsin Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10
    Notes 
    • The Wisconsin Marriage Index (pre-1907) shows the following marriage on 9 July 1829:
      Paul Gugnow and Louise Chamillo
      We believe these names are mispelled due to the poor quality of the original records. [10]
    Last Modified  12 Sep 2007 
    Family ID  F5031  Group Sheet
     
  • Notes 


    • From Appleton Library's "Appleton History"

      First European Settlers in Wisconsin
      ...

      While one branch of the Grignon family settled in Kaukauna, anothe rbranch continued working along the Fox River as fur traders. Hippolyte"Paul" Grignon, Augustin's brother, knew the river well from serving as an agent for the American Fur Company of Milwaukee. All who worked the river were familiar with the series of rushing falls known as the Grand Chute. A common landing spot for river travelers was a small piece of flat land just slightly upstream of the falls, on the river's north bank. It was here, beneath the towering bluffs, that Paul Grignon chose for the site of his home and business. Just to the west of what is now Appleton's Lutz Park, Paul, in 1835, built a trading post which he named White Heron. He then brought his family from Green Bay: his wife, Lisette, and their two young children, Minor and Simon. Years later, Simon would recall making that trip, walking with the family's possessions through grass taller than his head. When settled in their new home, the Grignon family became the first people of European descent to live in what is now the city of Appleton.


      From Appleton Library's "Appleton History
      "
      Despite all the financial dealings and property exchanges, the land itself remained essentially unchanged throughout these years. Until the mid-1840s, Paul Grignon's White Heron was the only building for miles around. Everything was forest then, thick with oaks and maples and elms, looking much as it had for thousands of years. Small ravines cries-crossed the area, some with tiny, trickling streams, others overgrown with brush. The river was still clean and fresh, and the power of the rapids -- the grand chute -- still unharnessed. It was a new land, open and empty, But it wasn't to remain that way for long. The Wisconsin Territory was organized by Congress in 1836, and settlers soon began pouring in.

      First Catholic Mass
      Paul Grignon's home White Heron was the site of the first Catholic Mass celebrated in Appleton. Father Bonduel of Poygan officiated in 1848.

      Land Sales
      The land to the north of the Fox River was surveyed in 1843-44, and about 900 acres were sold over the next two years. It was at this time that Paul Grignon finally purchased the property where he and his family had lived for the previous decade. Paying the standard government price of $1.25 an acre, Grignon purchased 10.66 acres. In 1843, another settler, Jean Bapiste Benoit, had built a home on a small piece of land just down the river from Grignon, near what is today the north end of the Appleton Memorial Bridge. Benoit also purchased his land from the government in 1845, but he then sold it one month later to Paul Grignon's brother, Augustin, and to Daniel Whitney, a Green Bay businessman. Augustin Grignon and Daniel Whitney were speculators, who bought the land for later resale in hopes of making a profit. With the exception of Paul Grignon and Jean Benoit, all of the first landowners in the Grand Chute area were speculators; none of them ever lived in Appleton.

      From death notice of his granddaughter, Miss Rachel Grignon:
      ... Her grandfather, Hippolyte Grignon, came here in 1835 and established the White Heron trading post. Other forebears include Charles de Langlade, a famed Indian fighter, and Pierre Grignon, a fur trader who settled in Green Bay about 1763.

      From AntigoGenealogyGopher.com"
      He built the "White Heron" in Grand Chute, Brown/Outagamie County in 1835 to house his family and serve as an inn and trading post. [11]
     
  • Sources 
    1. [S60] Family Data Collection - Births, Edmund West, comp., ([database online]).

    2. [S43] Wisconsin, Langlade, Antigo - AntigoGenealogyGopher,com, ([available online] ), Descendants of Paul-Hippolyte Grignon (Reliability: 3).
      online
      This is a working copy of my research which means not everything has been verified and documented and I have also made some guesses to determine future research paths. It also means I made some typing errors. You are welcome to use this information in your own research but CAUTIONED to verify all information independently! Please e-mail me if you know of any corrections or information that would help my research.

    3. [S65] Leland Fischer Grignon Web Site.

    4. [S53] Wisconsin, Brown, Lawrence - 1850 U.S. Census, Wisconsin, Brown County, (Washington, D.C.: The National Archives), Paul Grignon household, city of Lawrence, town of Grand Chute, M432_994, dwelling 560, family 604 (Reliability: 3).

    5. [S43] Wisconsin, Langlade, Antigo - AntigoGenealogyGopher,com, ([available online] ), Descendants of Paul-Hippolyte Grignon (Reliability: 3).
      This is a working copy of my research which means not everything has been verified and documented and I have also made some guesses to determine future research paths. It also means I made some typing errors. You are welcome to use this information in your own research but CAUTIONED to verify all information independently! Please e-mail me if you know of any corrections or information that would help my research.

    6. [S62] Family Data Collection - Individual Records, Edmund West, comp., ([database online] The Generations Network, Inc., 2000).

    7. [S74] OneWorldTreeSM.

    8. [S64] Family Data Collection - Marriages, Hippolyte Grignon and Nanette Shu (Reliability: 3).

    9. [S64] Family Data Collection - Marriages.

    10. [S66] Wisconsin Marriages, pre-1907, Ancestry.com, ([available online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original Data: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services. Wisconsin Vital Record Index, pre-1907. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services Vital Records Division, 19xx.), Paul Gugnow and Louise Chamillo - 09 Jul 1829; Vol 1, page 3 (Reliability: 3).

    11. [S70] Wisconsin, Outagamie, Appleton - Appleton History, Appleton Public Library, ([available online] based on a pamphlet created by Library staff in 1991 entitled "A History of the Founding of Appleton.").